The Secret Life of Plants

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ruthbancroftgarden:

Chile has quite a number of globular cacti with very dark epidermises, both in the genus Eriosyce and also Copiapoa. This one is Eriosyce heinrichiana, from arid north-central Chile. It has several synonyms, including Neochilenia jussieui and Neoporteria jussieui, and is often seen in nurseries or collections under one of these names. Eriosyce was once a very small genus, but it was expanded greatly to include all of the species formerly placed in Neoporteria, Neochilenia, Horridocactus, Pyrrhocactus and Rodentiophila.
-Brian

ruthbancroftgarden:

Chile has quite a number of globular cacti with very dark epidermises, both in the genus Eriosyce and also Copiapoa. This one is Eriosyce heinrichiana, from arid north-central Chile. It has several synonyms, including Neochilenia jussieui and Neoporteria jussieui, and is often seen in nurseries or collections under one of these names. Eriosyce was once a very small genus, but it was expanded greatly to include all of the species formerly placed in Neoporteria, Neochilenia, Horridocactus, Pyrrhocactus and Rodentiophila.

-Brian

— 18 hours ago with 59 notes
#Eriosyce heinrichiana  #Eriosyce  #cactus  #flower 
libutron:

Creeping Fuchsia - Fuchsia procumbens
Fuchsia procumbens (Myrtales - Onagraceae) is a species native to New Zealand naturally uncommon and is the smallest fuchsia in the world. It is strictly a coastal species found on sandy, gravelly or rocky places near the sea in the North Island.
The flowers are unusual for a fuchsia in that they are upright and yellow in color with red anthers and blue pollen. The flowers occur in September - May followed by edible red berries in early winter.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2010)

libutron:

Creeping Fuchsia - Fuchsia procumbens

Fuchsia procumbens (Myrtales - Onagraceae) is a species native to New Zealand naturally uncommon and is the smallest fuchsia in the world. It is strictly a coastal species found on sandy, gravelly or rocky places near the sea in the North Island.

The flowers are unusual for a fuchsia in that they are upright and yellow in color with red anthers and blue pollen. The flowers occur in September - May followed by edible red berries in early winter.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©James Gaither | Locality: cultivated - San Francisco, California, US (2010)

— 1 day ago with 182 notes
#fuchsia  #creeping fuchsia  #fuchsia procumbens  #flower 

ruthbancroftgarden:

Colletia is an interesting genus from southeastern South America. It belongs to the Rhamnaceae, which also includes the genus Ceanothus. Unlike Ceanothus, the species in Colletia are notable for how thorny they are. The plant pictured is a godd-sized shrub named Colletia paradoxa (a synonym is Colletia cruciata), sometimes called “anchor plant” on account of the stiff succulent projections from the stem which give it a unique appearance. Its myriad white flowers in late summer and fall are fragrant. From Uruguay and southern Brasil.

-Brian

— 1 day ago with 8 notes
#colletia  #flower  #tree 

forsythiahill:

My sheer pink Naked Ladies are blooming! Amaryllis belladonna is a very interesting plant. It fooled two people that I gave bulbs to last year. They both thought the plant was dead because what happens in the Spring is the wide strappy foilage appears and then disappears, then a few months later, SURPRISE, here comes the bloom!

It’s a fun plant to have. It’s also called referred to as Magic Lily, the Resurrection Lily, and Surprise Lily.

(via plant-a-day)

— 1 day ago with 54 notes
#amaryllis  #amaryllis belladonna  #flower 

ruthbancroftgarden:

Russelia equisetiformis is a shrub from Mexico which belongs to the Scrophulariaceae. It has several common names: Firecracker Plant, Coral Plant, Fountain Plant. The last name refers to its growth habit, with new shoots rising up and then arching over gracefully. The flowers may be pink, coral or red, and they continue all through the summer and fall. The leaves are tiny, so most of the green is provided by the stems.

-Brian

— 1 day ago with 17 notes
#russelia  #russelia equisetiformis  #flower